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Protect our Waterways appeal after dead fish incidents!

Dead fishes incident in July 2012 - in that case summer heat was starving fishes of oxygen.

Dead fishes incident July 2012 at Burstwick Drain – in that case summer heat starved fish of oxygen

DEAD FISH have been spotted in the waterways around Hedon.

Several people contacted the Blog last week to express their concerns about the distressing sight of dead fish in our local waterways, particularly along the Hedon Haven and Westlands Drain. Dog walkers had noticed lots of dead fish of all sizes and types floating on the water. One person had seen four small dead roach with their “guts hanging out” but had not been eaten. The issue of dead fish was also raised as a concern at the last Hedon Town Council meeting.

Mr Grahame Tranmer had also seen the dead fish, but also noticed a foul smell coming from the water and suspected it might be a pollutant. He promptly reported the matter to the Environment Agency. Mr Tranmer has appealed for residents to be vigilant and report anything suspicious to the Environment Agency.

Protect our waterwaysFollowing another dead fish incident last month, Mr Tranmer commented on the Blog:

“I hope this does not detract too much from the general recovery this water has enjoyed over the last ten years or so and the main population of fish survive which at the last count had at thirteen species.

We also enjoy the common sight of the kingfisher. Unfortunately we now have a population of mink which I think have been to blame for the decline of the water vole. But to end on a better note I have spotted otter tracks and otters have been seen near Saltend lets hope they stick around!”

In September 2008 a suspected incident of pollution at Burstwick Drain led to thousands of fish being killed along a 2km stretch of the waterway.

Note: It is assumed that water pollution comes from places like factories, farms and industrial sources. Yet, according to the Environment Agency, in many cases the pollution comes from a much less obvious source – our homes. Incorrect plumbing could mean that waste water from dishwashers, washing machines, sinks, baths and even toilets is flushed directly into a local waterway. These ‘mis-connected’ pipes are a common cause of pollution to rivers and streams, especially in towns and cities.

Advice on water pollution from your home is available on the Environment Agency website.

It is hoped that the increased vigilance of residents can help safeguard against future dead fish incidents and help support our waterways and the rich variety of wildlife they support.

Note: Causing or permitting pollution may result in a fine of up to £50,000, prosecution and expensive clean up costs!

Incidents should be reported to the Environment Agency on 0800 80 70 60.

Visit: Environment Agency Website – Report an incident

2 replies »

  1. this also coincides with the dredging further down towards salt end. could there be an increase of the sediment being pushed back up the system. I hadnt noticed dead fish until the dredging happened. Also the wacky temperatures can put a lot of stress on the fish. a combination of things will make the fish susceptible to illness and death

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